How To Prevent Melanoma and Skin Cancer

HOW TO PREVENT MELANOMA

85% of skin cancers are caused by UV radiation.  Overexposure to the sun and other sources of ultraviolet radiation are known to cause harm to the skin, eyes and immune system. The number one preventable risk factor for the most common form of melanoma is overexposure to damaging UVR.

Learn How to Block the Rays

 

SUNSCREEN

Generously Apply SPF 50+ Broad Spectrum Sunscreen, Every 2 Hours.

Learn more about Sunscreen click here

COVER UP

Wear Clothing with UVA/UVB Sun Protection. UVA/UVB wrap around sunglasses and a
Broad brimmed hat that shades your face, neck and ears.

SEEK SHADE

Seek Shade Between Peak UV Hours
11:00 A.M.and 3:00 P.M. March to October.

AVOID ARTIFICIAL TANNING DEVICES
Tanning Beds Cause Cancer

  • Early exposure to tanning beds can increase a person’s chance of developing melanoma by up to 75%.[4
  • Artificial tanning devices emit 15x the amount of UV rays as from sun exposure .
  • Tanning bed use has been estimated to be responsible for more than 450 000 non-melanoma skin cancer cases and more than 10 000 melanoma cases each year in the United States of America, Europe and Australia combined. The largest portion of users are women, and in particular adolescents and young adults. (WHO World Health Organization)
  • WHO, World Health Organization’s International Agency of Research on Cancer panel have declared ultraviolet radiation from the sun and artificial sources, such as tanning beds and sun lamps, to be a known carcinogen (cancer-causing substance). For more information on tanning beds click here

Know The UV Facts

AGING AND SUNBURNS

Sunlight consists of two types of harmful rays. UVA RAYS go deep into the skin and cause premature skin AGING and wrinkling. UVB RAYS BURN the surface layers of the skin and play a key role in the development of skin cancer.

UV RAYS AND CLOUDY DAYS

Cloudy days are not risk-free. Up to 80% of the sun’s rays can penetrate clouds, fog and haze.

POOL SIDE OR SEA SIDE

Water can reflect and scatter UV rays, increasing your UV exposure by 25%

UV RAYS LOVE WINTER

Fresh white snow reflects up to 88% of the sun’s UV rays, almost doubling a person’s UV exposure. Learn more about winter sun safety click here

WATCH 

Sun Safety Insights

Did you get a sunburn this year - 2020?

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How often do you wear sunscreen

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Why do you wear sunscreen?

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LEARN MORE ABOUT SUN SAFETY
Helpful links

Sun Safety Council

SUN SAFETY COUNCIL

A national advisory committee lead by the Melanoma Network of Canada, composed of industry leaders and organisations that have an interest in the development, promotion and advancement of sun safety awareness and an interest in reducing the impact of solar and UV (ultra violet radiation – including indoor tanning equipment), in prevention of skin cancers.

ENVIRONMENT CANADA Environment Canada Daily UV Report  – CLICK HERE

IPSOS Sun Safety Survey Results 

Sun Myths

Sun myths debunked.

How to Detect Melanoma

When spotted early, melanoma has a cure rate of 85%. Learn to spot the ABCDE’s of melanoma.

Tanning Beds are Dangerous

In 2009, WHO’s International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified exposure to UV-emitting tanning devices as carcinogenic to humans.

Sources:
Canadian Cancer Society. Melanoma Overview. Available at: http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/skin-melanoma/overview/.

Institute of Medicine of the National Academies. Dietary reference intakes for calcium and vitamin D. Washington, D.C.: The National Academies Press; 2011. Available at: http://www.iom.edu/Reports/2010/Dietary-Reference-Intakes-for-Calcium-and-Vitamin-D.aspx

National Cancer Institute. What You Need To Know About Melanoma and Other Skin Cancers. http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/wyntk/skin/.

World Health Organization. Skin cancers – UV Dangers. Available at: ttp://who.int/uv/faq/skincancer/en/index1.html.

“The Association of Use of Sunbeds with Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma and Other Skin Cancers: A Systematic Review,” International Journal of Cancer 120, no. 5(2006): 1116 – 1122. Available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ijc.22453/abstract.

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